Case study of echolalia

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Purpose: In this case study, we investigated the use of repetition in an individual with a neurogenic communication disorder. Method: We present an analysis of interaction in natural conversations between a woman with advanced Huntington's disease HD , whose speech had been described as sometimes characterised by echolalia, and her personal assistant. The conversational interaction is analysed on a sequential level, and recurrent patterns are explored. Results: Although the ability of the person with HD to interact is affected by chorea, word retrieval problems and reduced comprehension, she takes an active part in conversation. The conversational partner's contributions are often adapted to her communicative ability as they are formulated as questions or suggestions that can be elaborated on or responded to with a simple 'yes' or 'no'. The person with HD often repeats the words of her conversational partner in a way that extends her contributions and shows listenership, and this use of repetition is also frequent in ordinary conversations between non-brain-damaged individuals.

Echolalia Isn’t Meaningless – 12 Ways Autistic Children Use it to Communicate

12 Things Your Child Is Trying to Tell You With Echolalia - Autism

Language is often impaired in patients with a primary degenerative dementia syndrome. Severe dementia may even lead to mutism, a condition in which the person does not produce any spontaneous speech, despite preservation of consciousness. The question is if there are any language abilities left in patients who do not speak. In this single case-study the echolalic behaviour of a patient with severe dementia and mixed transcortical aphasia or isolation of the speech area was analysed by means of special linguistic tasks. In repeating sentences violating number agreement, the patient spontaneously corrected the pronoun, the noun or the verb.

[A psycholinguistic study in a patient with echolalia]

Skip to search form Skip to main content You are currently offline. Some features of the site may not work correctly. DOI: However, recently it has been shown that echoes may serve interactional goals. This article, which presents a case study of a six-year-old child with autism, examines how social interaction organizes autism echolalia and how repetitive speech responds to discernible interactional trajectories.
A 4-year-old boy accompanies his mother into your exam room. He holds a piece of string and sits on the floor without looking at you. He makes forced exhalations that result in a low-pitched repetitive vocalization. He begins moving a toy car back and forth repeatedly; he lowers his head to be on level with the car and stares at the wheels. After taking history from the mother and giving the child some time to warm up to you, he still does not initiate any eye contact or social interaction.
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